Protest

Occupy Banner - From New York to the Bull City

On October 9, 2011, Occupy protests were taking place in over 95 cities across the world. In mid-October, the movement found its way to Durham, North Carolina, a city that in recent years had had to battle against social economic disparity and gentrification. Occupy Durham has devoted the last three months to fighting for financial freedom…

Aerial view of Hillside High School in the 1950s

What shall we teach our children about race and race relations? Wallace Nelson, a Cincinnati representative of the Congress for Racial Equality, silenced the Hillside High School Parent-Teacher Association meeting on January 14th, 1952.

Nelson’s answer was a boycott of segregated public spaces to prove that non-violent direct action was…

Silent March ends with speakers in front of Durham City Hall (now the site of the Durham Arts Council)

Certain events are so monumental that they define the soul of a generation. Where were you when the planes hit on 9/11?  What were you doing when MLK was cut down by a sniper’s bullet? Such defining moments unite us all through our most basic commonality—being human. Black and white alike, Americans across the nation reacted with sorrow and…

Protesters marched daily to demand that the Durham City Council enforce the local housing code against slumlord Abe Greenberg. Photograph by Billy E. Barnes, courtesy of the North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Billy Ebert Barnes Collection.

“Your Neighbor is a Slumlord.”
“High Rent for Firetraps.”
“My Children Sleep with Rats.”

Protesters with painted signs bearing these word marched outside both Abe Greenberg’s office and home during the summer of 1966 in response to his unwarranted hikes in rent and disregard for the needs of his tenants by not meeting Durham…